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The trial compared three physiotherapy approaches: manual or exercise therapy compared with a single session of physiotherapy education (SSPT) for people with osteoporotic vertebral fracture(s). At 1 year, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups meaning there is inadequate evidence to support manual or exercise therapy. INTRODUCTION: To evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of different physiotherapy approaches for people with osteoporotic vertebral fracture(s) (OVF). METHODS: >Prospective, multicentre, adaptive, three-arm randomised controlled trial. Six hundred fifteen adults with back pain, osteoporosis, and at least 1 OVF participated. INTERVENTIONS: 7 individual physiotherapy sessions over 12 weeks focused on either manual therapy or home exercise compared with a single session of physiotherapy education (SSPT). The co-primary outcomes were quality of life and back muscle endurance measured by the QUALEFFO-41 and timed loaded standing (TLS) test at 12 months. RESULTS: At 12 months, there were no statistically significant differences between groups. Mean QUALEFFO-41: - 1.3 (exercise), - 0.15 (manual), and - 1.2 (SSPT), a mean difference of - 0.2 (95% CI, - 3.2 to 1.6) for exercise and 1.3 (95% CI, - 1.8 to 2.9) for manual therapy. Mean TLS: 9.8 s (exercise), 13.6 s (manual), and 4.2 s (SSPT), a mean increase of 5.8 s (95% CI, - 4.8 to 20.5) for exercise and 9.7 s (95% CI, 0.1 to 24.9) for manual therapy. Exercise provided more quality-adjusted life years than SSPT but was more expensive. At 4 months, significant changes above SSPT occurred in endurance and balance in manual therapy, and in endurance for those ≤ 70 years, in balance, mobility, and walking in exercise. CONCLUSIONS: Adherence was problematic. Benefits at 4 months did not persist and at 12 months, we found no significant differences between treatments. There is inadequate evidence a short physiotherapy intervention of either manual therapy or home exercise provides long-term benefits, but arguably short-term benefits are valuable. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN 49117867.

Original publication

DOI

10.1007/s00198-019-05133-0

Type

Conference paper

Publication Date

02/2020

Volume

31

Pages

277 - 289

Keywords

Exercise therapy, Manual therapy, Osteoporosis, Physical therapy, Rehabilitation, Spinal fracture