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Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a debilitating, chronic, persistent inflammatory disease that is characterised by painful and swollen joints. The aetiology of RA is unknown, however whereas past research has concentrated on the role of immune or inflammatory infiltrating cells in inflammation, it is becoming clear that stromal cells play a critical part in regulating the quality and duration of an inflammatory response. In this review we assess the role of fibroblasts within the inflamed synovium in modulating immune responses; in particular we examine the role of stromal cells in the switch from resolving to persistent inflammation as is found in the rheumatoid synovium.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.jbspin.2004.03.009

Type

Journal article

Journal

Joint Bone Spine

Publication Date

01/2005

Volume

72

Pages

10 - 16

Keywords

Animals, Arthritis, Rheumatoid, Cell Communication, Chronic Disease, Humans, Leukocytes, Stromal Cells, Synovitis