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The role of intestinal eosinophils in immune homeostasis is enigmatic and the molecular signals that drive them from protective to tissue damaging are unknown. Most commonly associated with Th2 cell-mediated diseases, we describe a role for eosinophils as crucial effectors of the interleukin-23 (IL-23)-granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) axis in colitis. Chronic intestinal inflammation was characterized by increased bone marrow eosinopoiesis and accumulation of activated intestinal eosinophils. IL-5 blockade or eosinophil depletion ameliorated colitis, implicating eosinophils in disease pathogenesis. GM-CSF was a potent activator of eosinophil effector functions and intestinal accumulation, and GM-CSF blockade inhibited chronic colitis. By contrast neutrophil accumulation was GM-CSF independent and dispensable for colitis. In addition to TNF secretion, release of eosinophil peroxidase promoted colitis identifying direct tissue-toxic mechanisms. Thus, eosinophils are key perpetrators of chronic inflammation and tissue damage in IL-23-mediated immune diseases and it suggests the GM-CSF-eosinophil axis as an attractive therapeutic target.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.immuni.2015.07.008

Type

Journal article

Journal

Immunity

Publication Date

21/07/2015

Volume

43

Pages

187 - 199

Keywords

Animals, Cell Movement, Colitis, Cytokine Receptor Common beta Subunit, Eosinophil Peroxidase, Eosinophils, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor, Inflammation, Interleukin-23 Subunit p19, Interleukin-5, Intestines, Leukocyte Reduction Procedures, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Neutrophils, Tumor Necrosis Factors