Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Building work at the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology has finished, providing a new third floor that houses additional meeting and collaboration space for data science and offices for the management of clinical trials.

The front entrance to the Kennedy Institute
The completed roof extension provides additional 'dry lab' space for data scientists

"We are delighted to be welcoming our staff and students to the new roof extension. It provides much needed space for writing and collaborative work, and will ensure we can deliver on our mission to expand our data-driven research across inflammatory and degenerative disease."

- Professor Fiona Powrie, Director of the Kennedy Institute 

Let us take you on a tour of our new third floor roof terrace.

Read more about the extension and the strategic plans of the Kennedy. 

Similar stories

The Kennedy Institute Student Symposium returns for its 5th year

A two-day student symposium returned to the Kennedy Institute bringing together students and peers from across the department to discuss their latest research.

Researchers from the Kennedy Institute awarded MRC funding

Tonia Vincent, Jelena Bezbradica and Alex Clarke have been awarded funding grants by the Medical Research Council (MRC) for different projects.

EPSRC funds research to avert an antibiotics apocalypse

Researchers at the Kennedy Institute join a collaboration to find new ‘drug-free’ ways of treating illnesses where current treatments have become ineffective due to antibiotic resistance.

Major ERC funding awarded to Professor Michael Dustin

Professor Michael Dustin and an international team of collaborators have been awarded a €10M grant from the European Research Council (ERC) to develop a new biotechnology around supramolecular attack particles (SMAPs) engineered to kill cancer cells.

Drug may boost vaccine responses in older adults

A preliminary study shows that a drug which helps immune cells self-clean may improve vaccine protection in older adults

£3M invested to drive forward early translation through five new Oxford-Bristol Myers Squibb Fellowships

Five new Oxford-Bristol Myers Squibb Fellowships representing an investment of £3M have been announced. The fellowships (formerly Oxford-Celgene) will support postdoctoral researchers and clinicians across five departments within the Medical Sciences Division and the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Division, providing an opportunity for them to gain exposure to the field of commercial drug discovery and development.