Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.
  • Impact of persistent hip or knee pain on overall health status in elderly people: a longitudinal population study.

    3 July 2018

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate hip or knee symptoms in older persons from a longitudinal, population perspective, and to determine the impact of persistent hip or knee pain on general health status over time. METHODS: A postal questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 5,500 individuals ages > or = 65 years containing the Short Form 36 (SF-36) general health survey, Lequesne hip and knee indices, and a hip/knee pain severity item. Respondents reporting hip or knee symptoms at baseline received an identical questionnaire 12 months later. Respondents were classified into a persistent pain group with either hip or knee pain at both baseline and followup, and a non-persistent pain group who reported hip or knee pain at baseline but no pain at followup. RESULTS: At baseline, 1,305 (40.7%) of 3,210 eligible respondents reported hip or knee pain. At 1 year, 1,072 (82.1%) of 1,305 individuals responded, of whom 820 (76.5%) remained symptomatic (the persistent group). In multivariate analysis, baseline factors identified as strongly related to having persistent pain were maximum Lequesne score (odds ratio [OR] 1.09, P < 0.001), maximum hip/knee pain score (OR 1.61, P < 0.001), and number of painful hip and knee joints at baseline (OR 1.48, P = 0.004). Following adjustment for age, sex, and baseline score, differences in mean SF-36 change scores of the 2 groups were significant for all dimensions except for mental health. CONCLUSION: In older persons, a symptomatic hip or knee frequently progresses in terms of worsening symptoms and accrual of other symptomatic hip or knee joints. The impact of persistent symptoms on general health is substantial.

  • Large replication study and meta-analyses of DVWA as an osteoarthritis susceptibility locus in European and Asian populations.

    3 July 2018

    Recently, through a genome wide association study in Japanese knee osteoarthritis (OA) cases, a previously unknown gene, DVWA, was identified. The non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs7639618 was subsequently found to be consistent and most significantly associated in Japanese and Han Chinese knee OA studies and functional relevant. Here, the association of the DVWA polymorphisms (rs7639618, rs11718863 and rs9864422) was genotyped in 1120 knee OA cases, 1482 hip OA cases and 2147 controls, all of white European descent from the Netherlands, the UK, Spain and Greece. Random effect DerSimonian and Laird meta-analyses were performed to assess the association in the different strata. To assess a more global effect, the original Japanese and Chinese data were included with the European. The meta-analyses provided evidence for global association of rs7639618 with knee OA with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.15-1.45 and a P-value of 2.70 x 10(-5). This effect, however, showed moderate heterogeneity, and rs7639618 was not independently associated with knee OA in Europeans, with an OR of 1.16, 95% CI of 0.99-1.35 and a P-value of 0.063. Furthermore, no association was observed with hip OA in Europeans, with a P-value of 0.851. Our results suggest that there may be global relevance for the DVWA SNP rs7639618 among knee OA cases, however, the apparent lower effect size in combination with the higher risk allele frequency in the European samples highlights again the ethnic differences in effects of discovered OA susceptibility genes.

  • Shoulder pain.

    3 July 2018

  • Generating iPSCs: translating cell reprogramming science into scalable and robust biomanufacturing strategies.

    3 July 2018

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have the potential to transform drug discovery and healthcare in the 21(st) century. However, successful commercialization will require standardized manufacturing platforms. Here we highlight the need to define standardized practices for iPSC generation and processing and discuss current challenges to the robust manufacture of iPSC products.

  • Are inflammatory cells increased in painful human tendinopathy? A systematic review.

    3 October 2018

    BACKGROUND: The role of inflammation in tendinopathy has historically been a subject of significant controversy. Our primary aim was to determine whether inflammatory cell numbers were increased in painful human tendinopathy versus healthy control tendons. Our secondary aim was to assess whether the inflammatory cells had been linked with symptoms or disease stage. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of the scientific literature using the PRISMA and Cochrane guidelines of the Medline database using specific search criteria. Only studies measuring inflammatory cells using specific markers in tissue from human patients with the clinical diagnosis of tendinopathy were included. Inclusion was agreed on by 2 independent researchers on review of abstracts or full-text using specific predetermined criteria. The search yielded 5 articles in total. RESULTS: There were increased numbers of macrophages (4 studies) and mast cells (3 studies) in tendinopathic versus healthy control tissues. One study demonstrated increased numbers of T cells in tendinopathic tissue versus healthy control tendons. There were reduced numbers of T cells (1 study), macrophages (2 studies) and mast cells (2 studies) in torn tendon versus intact tendinopathic tissue. CONCLUSIONS: The existing evidence supports the hypothesis that increased numbers of inflammatory cells are present in pathological tendons. The lack of high-quality quantitative studies in this area demonstrates a clear need for future research to better understand the role of inflammation in tendinopathy.

  • Localized cartilage assessment with three-dimensional dGEMRIC in asymptomatic hips with normal morphology and cam deformity.

    3 July 2018

    BACKGROUND: Cam deformities cause femoroacetabular impingement and damage the acetabular labral-chondral complex. The aims of this study were to investigate the potential of delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) to detect cartilage disease in asymptomatic hips with cam deformities compared with morphologically normal hips, establish whether dGEMRIC could identify advanced disease in hips with positive clinical findings, and establish whether cartilage damage correlated with the severity of the cam deformity. METHODS: Subjects were recruited from a prospective study of individuals with a family history of osteoarthritis and their spouses who served as control subjects. Their symptoms and impingement test results were recorded. Asymptomatic hips with normal radiographic joint-space width were placed in a subgroup according to the presence of a cam deformity and the impingement test result. dGEMRIC was performed on a 3-T system, studying two regions of interest: the anterosuperior aspect of the acetabular cartilage (T1(acet)) and the total femoral and acetabular cartilage (T1(total)). The ratio T1(acet)/T1(total) gave the relative glycosaminoglycan content in the anterosuperior aspect of the acetabular cartilage. The cohort was placed in subgroups by joint morphology, impingement test status, and genetic predisposition; the mean T1 scores were compared, and the alpha angle and T1 were correlated. RESULTS: Of thirty-two subjects (mean age, fifty-two years), nineteen had cam deformities. Hips with a cam deformity had reduced acetabular glycosaminoglycan content compared with normal hips (mean T1(acet)/T1(total), 0.949 and 1.093, respectively; p = 0.0008). Hips with a positive impingement test result had global depletion of glycosaminoglycan compared with hips with a negative result (mean T1(total), 625 ms versus 710 ms; p = 0.0152). T1(acet) inversely correlated with the magnitude of the alpha angle (r = -0.483, p = 0.0038), suggesting that the severity of cartilage damage correlates with the magnitude of the cam deformity. All of these differences occurred irrespective of genetic predisposition. CONCLUSIONS: The dGEMRIC technique can detect cartilage damage in asymptomatic hips with cam deformities and no radiographic evidence of joint space narrowing. This damage correlates with cam deformity severity. Further study of the application of dGEMRIC as an imaging biomarker of early osteoarthritis is justified to validate its prognostic accuracy, identify subjects for clinical trials, and evaluate the effectiveness of surgical procedures.

  • The incidence of pseudotumour in metal-on-metal hip resurfacing and the results of a screening tool for patient recall

    3 July 2018

    © 2013 EFORT. All rights are reserved. Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty (MoMHRA) was introduced in 1997 and has become an established surgical option, especially for younger patients with end-stage osteoarticular disease (Daniel et al. 2011). Designer and non-designer data continue to support the use of MoMHRA for this cohort of patients despite pseudotumour becoming an acknowledged complication (Murray et al. 2012; Treacy et al. 2011). The rates of pseudotumour are variable, and concern amongst the general public, healthcare providers and government is increasing together with the potential revision burden on hip services particularly compounded by poor reported outcomes post-revision (Glyn-Jones et al. 2009; Pandit et al. 2008; Hart et al. 2009; Kwon et al. 2011; Grammatopolous et al. 2009; Carrothers et al. 2010).